By Ellen Gilbert

“I have two words: John McPhee.” The New Yorker editor David Remnick’s (’81) explanation of what Princeton meant to him. 

“Your parents will remember your graduation almost as acutely, and with the same sense of wonder, as they remember the day you entered this world,” observed New Yorker editor David Remnick (’81) in his 2013 Class Day speech at Princeton University. “It’s an incredibly moving thing to see your child go into the word as a whole healthy person,” added the father of three. more

By Anne Levin

Images courtesy of University Medical Center of Princeton

Snce last September, contractors have been painstakingly demolishing the old Princeton Hospital to make room for a 280-unit development of rental apartments. The rambling complex that has stood for nearly a century at the corner of Witherspoon Street and Franklin Avenue, a beacon of Princeton’s Witherspoon/Jackson neighborhood, has been slowly disappearing amid the clanging, drilling, and dust. more

By Ilene Dube

Photography by Andrew Wilkinson

GOT RELIGION? Bai beverage founder Ben Weiss treats his brand like one. A shrine to Bai brand illuminates a niche just outside Weiss’s office. Encased in glass is the Book of Bai, “containing company secrets,” he says, “and a cryptic code for the civet cat.” Every year, the company elects its top five people. Five flags featuring their faces hang from the ceiling. “It’s all about the process of inspiring greatness in other people,” says Weiss, named Entrepreneur of the Year in 2013 by the Princeton Chamber of Commerce. The five qualities the five possess: “They are audacious, authentic, tenacious, obsessive and great.” more

By Linda Arntzenius

When people are having the isn’t-Princeton-a-great-place-to-live conversation, the town’s proximity to Manhattan and downtown Philadelphia often tops the best features list. And while it’s a boon to hop on a train for an evening at Lincoln Center or take visitors to see the Liberty Bell, for many locals one of the biggest benefits of living in this historic town is easy access to the nature that surrounds it. more

By Ilene Dube

French, Spanish, German, Hungarian, Russian and Chinese are among the languages in which you’ll hear the phrase “Good morning, children, it’s story time” spoken at the Princeton Public Library. The library offers its World Language Stories program to connect with the languages and cultures of the greater Princeton region. more

By Greta Cuyler

Photography by Andrew Wilkinson

SAVE, A Friend to Homeless Animals, will soon move from its longtime home on Herrontown Road in Princeton to a 10-acre property in Montgomery Township, complete with a new animal shelter and a renovated home for administrative offices. The plan is to move in early 2015, hopefully by March 1. It’s a project that’s been a long time in the making. more

By Anne Levin

Despite its diminutive size, New Jersey is home to the highest concentration of scientific professionals in the nation. Some even call the Garden State the “medicine chest of the world.” With 17 of the top 20 biopharmaceutical companies operating within its borders, little New Jersey is the epicenter of invention when it comes to science, technology, engineering and mathematics – the four words that form the popular acronym STEM. more

Interview by Kam Williams 

Actress and author Brooke Shields is a familiar face within the entertainment industry. Starting her career at just 11 months, Shields went on to star in Pretty Baby (1978), The Blue Lagoon (1980), and Endless Love (1981). She also caused a sensation with her advertising campaign for Calvin Klein. Shields attended Princeton University in 1983, graduating in 1988. Following college, Shields played the title role in Suddenly Susan and appeared on Seinfeld. She has just published her latest memoir There Was a Little Girl: The Real Story of My Mother and Me, written after the death of her mother, Teri Shields, in 2012. In it, Shields honestly examines her remarkable and often diffi cult relationship with her mother. Her previous memoir, Down Came the Rain, was a New York Times Bestseller. more

By Greta Cuyler

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia will open a new outpatient pediatric specialty care center in Plainsboro in late January. The first pediatric hospital in the nation, CHOP was ranked No. 1 on the U.S. News & World’s Report 2014-15 Honor Roll of the nation’s Best Children’s Hospitals. CHOP’s new building, located on the campus of the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro, will replace one that CHOP has leased at 707 Alexander Road for nearly the last decade. At 25,000 square feet, CHOP’s one-story facility be significantly larger than its current location and has the potential to expand to 100,000 square feet. more

By Stuart Mitchner

I grew up eating breakfast and lunch (and snacks) in the same room as a large threepart folding screen decorated from top to bottom with New Yorker covers. It was the only piece of furniture my parents owned that had no discernible purpose other than to be its own odd, cheery, colorful self. My Medievalist father, who was accustomed to working with illuminated manuscripts, had meticulously assembled and arranged it, making sure everything was precisely aligned. The screen, with all its vivid, amusing imagery refl ecting our familial infatuation with New York City was a companiable presence at a time when my diet consisted mostly of open-faced peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, then and now the ultimate comfort food. more

By Linda Arntzenius

Situated on the western flank of New Jersey, the picturesque town of Lambertville draws art lovers from both sides of the Delaware River. The town itself and the bucolic landscapes that surround it feature in the work of numerous artists displayed in the town’s many private galleries.

Kelly Sullivan’s studio is located three floors up above The Peoples Store at 28 North Union Street. The studio has its own entrance round the corner on Church Street and those who make the climb discover a bright airy space filled with scenes of the river valley. more

By Greta Cuyler 

Illustrations by Jorge Naranjo 

In July Amazon.com opened the doors to its new warehouse and fulfillment center inRobbinsville, bringing hundreds of jobs to Mercer County and millions to state and local coffers.

Amazon is a Fortune 500 company based in Seattle, Washington, offering an online marketplace where customers can browse and buy millions of new and used items, including books, movies, electronics, toys, clothes, jewelry, sporting goods, home and garden and much more. more

PM_Cambridge Ad

By Linda Arntzenius 

Photography by Andrew Wilkinson

“Music for a while, shall all your care’s beguile.” – Henry Purcell (1659-1695)

If the life story of accomplished musicians Carmen and Cezar Mateiescu was presented as an opera it would surely be styled as an Elizabethan romance, complete with cruel tyrant, divided and re-united lovers, and a long sojourn in the Holy Land, where he works as a carpenter against a backdrop of monasteries and rose gardens, and she gives birth to their first son in Nazareth. Far-fetched? Not one bit. more

By Linda Arntzenius

Illustrations by Jorge Naranjo

“You won’t succeed on Broadway if you don’t have any Jews,” Eric Idle’s clever quip from Monty Python’s Spamalot never fails to elicit laughter from a Broadway audience. It’s long been taken for granted that the Broadway musical is a particularly Jewish success story. Idle’s observation was expressed decades earlier by none other than Cole Porter, the exemplar of Broadway song composers. Porter, who was not Jewish, was once asked how he would go about writing “American” music. “I’ll write good Jewish tunes,” he said.

Michael Kantor’s recent documentary, The Broadway Musical—A Jewish Legacy, celebrates the Jewish roots of this distinctly American form with a loving look at Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern, George and Ira Gershwin, Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II, Kurt Weill, Sheldon Harnick, Jerry Bock, Leonard Bernstein, Stephen Sondheim, Stephen Schwartz, and Jule Styne, among many other giants of the Broadway stage. more

Photography by Benoit Cortet

Lindsay Newman, Main Street Bistro

Rose Petal Martini

3 oz. Hendricks Gin
1 oz. St. Germaine
1/2 oz. pear puree
1/2 oz. litchi juice
2 drops rosewater
Served up in a martini glass
Garnish with litchi more

10. Chocolate from Thomas Sweet: Princeton’s own chocolate-maker at 29 Palmer Square West always has small holiday-themed chocolates that can fit snugly in a stocking or hang on the tree.

9. “I Love Princeton” military style dog tags designed by Andrew Wilkinson available at A Store by Princeton Magazine, www.princetonmagazine.com.

8. Macaroons from Olives, 22 Witherspoon Street: Lots of stores in town sell macaroons, but our sources tell us that these sweet little gems are the best around. more

By Linda Arntzenius

The holiday season draws visitors to art museums in Princeton and beyond and Princeton Magazine here presents a round-up of exhibitions in town and further afield. Beginning close to home, art lovers who recently enjoyed the Arts Council of Princeton’s singular show marking the 25th anniversary of the Princeton Artists Alliance, will be able to see more work by this group as well as other contemporary New Jersey artists in America, Through Artists’ Eyes, an inspired new exhibition at the New Jersey State Museum.

Founded by local artist Charles McVicker, the Princeton Artists Alliance (PAA) includes some of Princeton’s most talented painters, sculptors and photographers. America, Through Artists’ Eyes began as the brainchild of one of them, Nancy Lee Kern. Kern passed away in the spring of this year and the show stands as a memorial to her. more