Photo Credit: @stewartchristie_co

Coats for men and women to keep you looking on-trend all season long. 

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Photo Credit: Sur La Table 

Get ready for Thanksgiving with these festive food items!

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Lawrence Charles B. Samuel Stanhope Smith 1750–1819, Class of 1769, President 1795–1812.

By Doug Wallack

On Monday, November 6, the Princeton & Slavery Project—an initiative of Princeton University—launched its website as a means of publicizing its ongoing research into the University’s relationship with the institution of slavery. Visitors to the site can find over 80 articles that, for instance, tease out the links between the fortunes of the University’s early benefactors and slavery, or examine the slave holdings of University presidents, trustees, and other affiliates. Also included online are hundreds of primary documents, data visualizations and maps that track the proportional enrollment of southern students at Princeton, and video documentaries in which students and alumni reflect on their own families’ relationships to slavery.  more

By Doug Wallack

Photography by Charles R. Plohn 

“Here we were taught by men and gothic towers democracy and faith and righteousness and love of unseen things that do not die.” — H.E. Mierow, Class of 1914

So reads the inscription in the arch of Princeton University’s McCosh Hall. It’s not entirely clear how Gothic towers inculcated such lofty virtues in students, but it is clear to anyone who visits campus how the University’s architecture could exercise a powerful influence on them. more

Roasted pumpkin ice cream from the bent spoon in Princeton’s Palmer Square (Photo Credit: Palmer Square).

Friday, October 27 

5 p.m.: Dress up in your best costume and join the Arts Council of Princeton for the Annual Hometown Halloween Parade. The parade will start at Palmer Square Green and end at the Princeton YMCA. The festivities will continue at Princeton YMCA with a bounce house, crafts, food and drink, and other family-friendly activities.

6:30 to 8 p.m.: Waldorf School of Princeton’s eighth grade class invites the public to a Halloween Walk. Experience magical tales and stories that come to life before your very eyes! The ticket price is $10 per single ticket and $25 for families of 3 or more. Groups leave at intervals beginning at 6:30 p.m. (last group will leave at 7:30 p.m.). This event supports the eighth grade as they raise funds for their class trip. more

By Anne Levin

With a mother and two paternal aunts who died of breast cancer, the two sisters knew it was important to get tested to see if they carried the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. Should the test come back positive, their risk of developing breast and/or ovarian cancer would be higher than average. And preventive measures—most likely mastectomy and/or hysterectomy—could be in order. more

By Ellen Gilbert 

Recent strides in the field of genetic engineering are generating tremendous excitement. Long in the works at university and company laboratories, the implications of this treatment are far-reaching.

The rapidly emerging immunotherapy approach is called adoptive cell transfer (ACT); it collects and uses patients’ own immune cells to treat their cancer. There are several types of ACT, but the star of the show right now is CAR T-cell therapy, which made medical history this last August when the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first genetic therapy for widespread use. Called Kymriah, it is being marketed by Novartis, a global healthcare company based in Switzerland. more

By Stuart Mitchner

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s famous line, “The very rich are different from you and me,” in his story “The Rich Boy,” inspired Ernest Hemingway’s sarcastic retort in “The Snows of Kilimanjaro, “Yes, they have more money.”

In The Language of Houses: How Buildings Speak to Us (Delphinium $25.95), novelist Alison Lurie begins by stating “A building is an inanimate object, but it is not an inarticulate one. Even the simplest house always makes a statement, one expressed in brick and stone and plaster, in wood and metal and glass, rather than in words—but no less loud and obvious.” more

Red Mill Museum Village

By William Uhl 

A symbol of early American industry, Clinton’s iconic Red Mill still sits aside the Raritan River. Since its construction two centuries ago, the mill’s sleepy water wheel has worked with cloth, minerals, food, and electricity. Now, the mill is home to an array of galleries. Some house historical reproductions, some display pieces from international artists, and others hold fragments of local Clinton history. more

PRINCETON HIGH SCHOOL NEIGHBORHOOD | ECLECTIC CAPE COD, BUILT IN 1924. RECENT RENOVATION by Architect Andrew Sheldon (1944 – 2017) INCLUDED LARGER FRONT DOOR AND NEW WINDOWS IN FRONT.

By Lynn Smith 

Photography by Jeffrey E. Tryon

Thank you to the proud owners of the smaller homes in Princeton for contributing to the character of our community. We have photographed a few of our favorites that have been lovingly maintained, restored, or constructed with architectural distinction for all of us to enjoy.

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By Wendy Plump 

Photography Courtesy of Nomadic Expeditions

In a dramatic re-interpretation of the notion “If you build it, they will come,” New Jersey resident and contractor Jalsa Urubshurow built a base for his adventure expedition company in Mongolia. He chose the South Gobi Province on the edge of the Gobi Desert—where the Altai Mountains rim the horizon—and put up forty Ger, the traditional felt yurts of Mongolia’s indigenous nomadic tribes. He designed the main lodge in the style of an ancient temple. He quarried local stone and installed local staffers – herders, guides, cooks – because he wanted authenticity in a world greatly in need of it, and, if truth be told, because he demanded the most breathtaking gateway for those visiting his beloved Mongolia, the home of his Kalmyk ancestors. more

By Wendy Greenberg

Escher Street in Trenton, 10am on a weekday: The line forms to the right of the double doors at the Trenton Area Soup Kitchen (TASK). Some of Trenton’s neediest individuals arrive by foot or by bicycle. A few push strollers, a few carry a bag of belongings. On rainy days, they huddle under a small awning. more

One thousand gallons of water a minute rise up 300 feet to irrigate this farm in San Diego, powered by solar energy alone.

By William Uhl 

Walking with Quentin Kelly, founder and CEO of WorldWater & Solar Technologies, Inc., you can tell he is very enthusiastic about what he does. The walls of his office in Princeton are decorated with maps of third-world countries like the Philippines, with red dots for each solar-powered water pump and purifier installed. Low-rise cubicles have pictures of flowing water and green crops in Haiti, Afghanistan, Darfur, and other places. And the boardroom has a row of photos of solar-powered farms in San Diego and the San Joaquin Valley. But WorldWater didn’t come into existence to fuel agriculture. more

By Laurie Pellichero

Photography by Charles R. Plohn 

From the moment you walk in the bright green door to Elephant in the Room Design in the Princeton North Shopping Center, you will see that it’s not your average consignment store. The clean, spacious 2,000-square-foot showroom is filled with artfully-arranged vignettes filled with an eclectic mix of new and consigned furniture and home decor items. more

By Taylor Smith 

When did you first realize your passion for interior design?

My passion for interior design came to me organically. After remodeling and decorating my own homes, I realized that I had a passion and unrealized skill set for interior design. So, after having my second daughter, I went from a stay-at-home mom to a student at The Art Institute of Philadelphia pursuing a degree in interior design.  more

By Taylor Smith 

When did you first realize your passion for kitchen and bath design? 

When I built my current house 16 years ago, my builder recognized that I had talent and suggested that I work with him. At the time I was working as a consultant for an employee benefit firm specifically designing health care plans and providing actuarial services. I have a love of math and the arts, and thought this opportunity would combine these two disparate traits very nicely. more

By Taylor Smith 

Princeton Orthopaedic Associates’ flagship office is located at 325 Princeton Avenue. The 25,000-square-foot space houses 17 orthopaedic surgeons and five physiatrists (physical medicine physicians), along with three podiatrists who handle comprehensive foot and ankle care for all patients. In addition to the Princeton Avenue location, Princeton Orthopaedic maintains four additional offices at 727 State Road in Princeton; 11 Centre Drive in Monroe; 340 Scotch Road in Ewing; and 5 Plainsboro Road, Suite 490 in Plainsboro. These offices serve greater Mercer County, Middlesex County, and Bucks County, Pennsylvania.  more

By Taylor Smith 

Located in the heart of Princeton, at 256 Bunn Drive, Suite 4, Dr. Eugenie Brunner specializes in cosmetic facial plastic surgery and much more.

Double board-certified by the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and the American Board of Otolaryngology, Dr. Brunner received her education and training at Rutgers University, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School – The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New York University Medical Center, and the University of Toronto. Affiliated with The University Medical Center at Princeton at Plainsboro, Dr. Brunner has served as an attending physician in the Department of Surgery since 1997, when her practice was first established in Princeton.  more