Photo Credit: @bloomingdales

New spring looks and fashion trends from Bloomingdale’s.

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NEW AND IMPROVED: Princeton Public Library unveils its redesigned second floor Saturday at a special day of activities. This sleek seating area is part of the vision of Andrew Berman, architect. (Photo by Cie Stroud Courtesy of Princeton Public Library)

Friday, March 24 

11 a.m.: Free, Tiger Tales for children ages 3-5 at Cotsen Children’s Library (repeats weekly).

5:15 p.m.: On Pointe Enrichment Series at American Repertory Ballet on the new ballet Pride and Prejudice. Artistic Director Douglas Martin will lead the discussion; Princeton Studio, 301 N. Harrison Street.

7 to 9 p.m.: The Plainsboro Writers Group presents “Selected Short Stories and Poems” at Princeton Public Library. Admission is free. more

“UNTITLED”: This photograph is from Ricardo Barros’s exhibit “Figuring Space.” He will speak at 7:30 p.m. at the D&R Greenway Land Trust, 1 Preservation Place, Princeton on Monday April 3. The event is free and open to the public.

By Doug Wallack

In his most recent work, noted photographer Ricardo Barros tackles the inexpressible — the abstraction that is space itself. Barros will be giving a lecture on his portfolio “Figuring Space” on Monday, April 3 for the Princeton Photography Club at the D&R Greenway. more

Photography by Jeffrey Tryon 

American and Dutch designers highlight a land transformed by tulips and eco-design 

The 2017 PHS Philadelphia Flower Show, “Holland: Flowering the World,” celebrates the beauty and ingenuity of Dutch culture, from vivid flower fields to innovative eco-design, on view through Sunday, March 19 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center.

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Photo Credit: @shopterrain

Incorporate these trendy plants into your home decor for spring. 

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The Princeton Pi Day Pie Eating Contest will take place at McCaffrey’s at the Princeton Shopping Center on Saturday, March 11 at 9 a.m. (Photo Credit: Princeton Tour Company)

Friday, March 10 

11 a.m.: Free, Tiger Tales for children ages 3-5 at Cotsen Children’s Library (repeats weekly).

12:30 p.m.: Free, Gallery Talk at Princeton University Art Museum on “A Singular Vision: Charles Rohlfs’s Chair and Chest.”

5:30 to 7:30 p.m.: Opening reception, “Mountain Lakes: A Lens on the Seasons” at the Arts Council of Princeton. Sales of photographs will benefit the Friends of Princeton Open Space, which maintains and enhances the Preserve for all to enjoy. more

Fresh lavender is just around the corner. 

By Sarah Emily Gilbert 

You don’t have to travel far to inhale the intoxicating scent of Provence, France. Hidden Spring Lavender Farm and Gift Shop is Skillman’s South of France. For over six years, Steve and Marie Voorhees have grown and harvested two-acres of lavender to sell in their barn turned retail store. more

20 acclaimed films with filmmakers and other speakers presented over seven days. 

The 2017 Princeton Environmental Film Festival opens Monday, March 27, and runs through Sunday, April 2. Now in its 11th year, the award-winning festival features a lineup of 20 acclaimed films with filmmakers and other speakers presented over seven days. Films and additional programs are scheduled both during the day and in the evening at the library, on the Princeton University campus and at the Princeton Garden Theatre. more

On Saturday, March 4 at 3 p.m.: Library Live at Labyrinth presents Kay Redfield Jamison: Robert Lowell, Setting the River on Fire. This event will be held at Labyrinth Books of Princeton.

Friday, March 3

11 a.m.: Free, Tiger Tales for children ages 3-5 at Cotsen Children’s Library (repeats weekly).

12:30 p.m.: Gallery Talk at Princeton University Art Museum on “African Beaded Work.”

4:30 p.m.: The Office of Religious Life at Princeton University and the Community of Sant’Egidio present “Who is a Refugee and Therefore Who Am I?” The event is part of a conference entitled Seeking Refuge: Faith-Based Approaches to Forced Migration. This event is free and open to the public. All lectures will be held at McCosh 50 at Princeton University more

Photo Credit: @jcrew

Graphic stripes are given a fresh look for spring.

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By Taylor Smith

Thanks to Audible’s Donald Katz, the general population now has more time than ever to consume and enjoy books by creating a digital library on their mobile devices. A membership allows users access to more than 325,000 downloadable audiobooks, audio editions of periodicals and other programs. New members are also given complimentary subscriptions to the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, making the inevitable commute or time spent at the gym, not only easier, but that much more enlightening. Below, Mr. Katz discusses his pre-Audible career as a journalist, love for Newark, and the company’s growing a-list collection of inspiring celebrity performances. more

By Anne Levin

Photographs Courtesy of Princeton in Africa 

fter the deadliest flooding ever recorded in Malawi, a group of recent college graduates were on hand to help with emergency response efforts. In rural Togo, another corner of Africa, some of their colleagues wrote grants to help an organization called Mothers2Mothers in their fight against pediatric AIDS. Still others from the group taught English, math, science, and history to secondary school students in Botswana. more

Navigating the sometimes troubled, always exciting waters of family, finance, and politics. 

By Donald Gilpin 

Portrait by Andrew Wilkinson

To say that Tom and Barbara Byrne thrive on difficult challenges would be an understatement. With all four children launched—this is the first year since 2006 they haven’t had a son or daughter at Princeton University—the 62-year-old Hun Road couple, whose groundbreaking resumes place them at the top of their professions, might be expected to be looking forward to retirement.

But no. They have other plans. more

By Anne Levin

If you attended a charity auction to benefit McCarter Theatre, Trinity Counseling Service, Princeton Charter School, or any number of other organizations in town last spring, you probably encountered Sebastian Clarke. He’s the lanky, personable guy who runs the show, rattling off the numbers and “filler words” to coax bidders higher and higher—but always with a light touch. more

“A great liberal arts education is the best possible training for a life in the theater. A class in theater is a wonderful training for life.” – Jane Cox, Director, Princeton University Program in Theater

Can lighting design make the world a better place? In the post-election season, award-winning lighting designer Jane Cox was struggling with the answer. Her mother ran Amnesty International in Ireland, working with political prisoners—an experience that had a formative impact on Cox. Lighting design, by contrast, seemed a frivolous pursuit. more

The Immigration Act of 1917 | One Hundred Years Later 

By Katie Duggan

Immigration is a foundation of the American experience, and an integral part of American life today. It has been frequent topic of discussion for politicians and social activists alike, especially in last year’s presidential election, leading to many divisive conversations on what the future holds for immigrants. But questions of who should be allowed entry into the United States are not unique to today’s political climate nor to the nation’s past. February 2017 marks the one hundredth anniversary of the passage of the Immigration Act of 1917, which was at the time the country’s most sweeping piece of immigration legislation. It was passed under President Woodrow Wilson, and required that immigrants entering the country first pass a literacy test. more

By Stuart Mitchner

In the “Amazing Grace” chapter of The Black Presidency (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt $27), Michael Eric Dyson calls the last week of June 2015 Barack Obama’s greatest as president. Setting the scene at Charleston’s Emanuel AME Church where Obama delivered a eulogy for the nine people slain by Dylann Roof, Dyson describes how the president “wrapped his vulnerability around the church” after the last words of the speech and “on the high wire of live television, before an audience of millions around the world,” began to sing “Amazing Grace.” more

Director Damien Chazelle and Emma Stone on the set of La La Land.

Damien Chazelle Talks About Golden Globe Winner “La La Land” 

Interview by Kam Williams 

Filmmaker Damien Chazelle met recently with film reviewer Kam Williams to talk about his latest movie, La La Land, which swept the Golden Globes, winning a record seven awards, and has received 14 Oscar nominations. A native of Princeton, New Jersey, Chazelle wrote and directed the Academy Award-winning Whiplash which landed five Oscar nominations, including Best Picture and Best Adapted Screenplay for Chazelle. The movie won a trio of Oscars in the Film Editing, Sound Mixing and Supporting Actor (J.K. Simmons) categories. more

By Anne Levin

A cluster of young women in semi-formal dresses is standing in the back of a candlelit auditorium at Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart. Teetering a bit on their high heels, they whisper quietly while awaiting their turn to take part in an annual tradition known as the Junior Ring Ceremony. more

Photo Credit: Camp Kieve

Find rollercoasters, horses, and s’more fun at summer camp this year. 

By Sarah Emily Gilbert 

In Allan Sherman’s famous song, “Hello Muddah, Hello Fadduh! (A Letter from Camp Granada),” he parodies a boy’s classic reaction to summer camp: initial anxiousness and homesickness followed by excitement and enthusiasm. To Sherman’s credit, summer camp can lead to some poison ivy, but it’s more likely to bring self-discovery, lifelong friendships, and even a first kiss. While away from their “Muddah and Fadduh” at summer camp, kids often undergo a transformative experience. They develop new personalities, challenge themselves mentally and physically, and beat the summer doldrums with a band of likeminded individuals. Luckily, Camp Granada doesn’t exist, but roller coaster camp, ice hockey camp, and film camp certainly do. Here, Princeton Magazine outlines a myriad of places that promise an unforgettable summer—without the alligators, bears, or malaria. more