Photo Credit: @garmin

Kids don’t have to have all the fun! Adults can enjoy the spirit of the fall season with tech gadgets, bikes, locks, and computer equipment to make that transition back to work, all the easier.

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TEAM WORK: “The issue in aging is that everyone is an individual, and the issues are different for every family. The family dynamics are different, and the fragmented healthcare system is very challenging. We are the single point of contact, the quarterback who can help people find what they need.” Joanna Gordon Martin, founder and CEO of Theia Senior Solutions (back row, far right), is shown with the company’s team of experts.

By Jean Stratton

If indeed, as studies indicate, 10,000 baby boomers are turning 65 every day and will continue to do so for at least the next decade, the implications for the health care system, for seniors and spouses with health problems, and for adult children of aging parents are very challenging. more

Manta Ray, photographed by Jennifer Hayes

By Taylor Smith

The Shark Research Institute (SRI) was founded in Princeton, New Jersey in 1991 as a center of scientific research. The organization maintains field offices across the world in places as far reaching as Mozambique and India. SRI is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit with the mission of studying and protecting sharks and their natural habitats. SRI and its scientific research team aim to correct misconceptions about sharks and instead teach the general population to value sharks as a vital part of the global ecosystem.

Marie Levine, executive director at SRI, oversees the day-to-day running of the various networks of scientists, field researchers, members, and donors that are involved in current SRI conservation projects. more

This year’s competition was held the first week of May and was hosted by Dartmouth in Hanover, NH. It is an international race where universities from the U.S., India, and Canada participate. Companies such as Boeing and GM sponsor school teams.

By Erica Cardenas

Photography by Ray Lego 

This past May concluded Princeton Racing Electric’s (PRE) 2016-2017 season. PRE started four years ago and is an extracurricular activity for PU students. Serious PU students dedicate a dozen hours per week to work on the PRE car and mechanics. PRE is funded by both independent sponsors and Princeton University; however, the team is on a budget and has to “design within their limits.” more

Hodge Road Princeton

Princeton’s Western Section Homes Adapt to 21st-Century Lifestyles

By Ilene Dube

Photography by Jon Roemer

Princeton’s Western section, bordered by Bayard Lane, Westcott Road, Elm Road and Stockton Street, is prized for its Colonial, Tudor, Victorian and Gothic homes. Designed by such noteworthy architects as Rolf Bauhan, John Notman and Charles Steadman, some of these houses have been lived in by members of the Stockton family, Woodrow Wilson and Grover Cleveland. Stately gardens and heirloom trees envelope the streets with a sense of nature. more

Surprise the college graduate in your life with something fabulous and functional. 

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Friday, May 12

6:30 to 8 p.m.: Damsel Duo, an indie-neo-folk group featuring Beth Meyers and Monica Mugan, presents a Mother’s Day concert with acoustic-based duo Helen and Molly. Molly Trueman of Helen and Molly is Mugan’s daughter; Hinds Plaza.

Saturday, May 13

9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: St. Lawrence Rehabilitation Center hosts its annual Bike Safety Rodeo and Safe Kids Day. Children ages 3-12 and their families are invited to learn about safety and prevention when participating in sports and other recreational activities. Children will receive free bike helmets, have their bikes inspected, and ride a safety course. RSVP by emailing bikerodeo@slrc.orgmore

By Donald Gilpin

West College, a prominent central campus building at Princeton University, will be named for emeritus faculty member and Nobel Prize-wining novelist Toni Morrison, and the major auditorium in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs will be named for Arthur Lewis, Nobel laureate in economics and a member of the school’s faculty from 1963 to 1983.  more

Photography by Robert Manella, Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s International Realty

The First in an Occasional Series

by Anne Levin

Back in the late eighteenth century when the Rev. John Witherspoon was the sixth president of Princeton University, he was known to end his work day at Nassau Hall when he saw a light in a front window of Tusculum, his 
country house and tenant farm located just a mile to the north. According to a local legend, one of Witherspoon’s daughters would light a candle in that window, letting her father know it was time to close up shop and head home. more

Photo Credit: @CristinaMittermeier | @natgeo

In honor of Earth Day on April 22, shop these green gifts, which are globally-minded in perspective. 

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by Donald Gilpin 

All things Trump have increasingly dominated the media since the election campaign last year, and especially in the wild first months of the Trump Presidency. A casual observer from another planet might well assume that the White House and President Trump, with an occasional nod to Capitol Hill or the Supreme Court, is the true seat of power in the United States—that the lives of U.S. citizens are shaped and determined by policies and directives from Washington. more

by Wendy Plump 

It turns out that surfers and philosophers have a lot in common. To be any good at what they do, they have to be hard-core realists. Good surf or bad, decent people or vile, the approach is the same: if you don’t want to be mullered, then deal effectively with conditions as you find them. As both a surfer and a philosopher, this is practically Peter Singer’s calling card. more

20 acclaimed films with filmmakers and other speakers presented over seven days. 

The 2017 Princeton Environmental Film Festival opens Monday, March 27, and runs through Sunday, April 2. Now in its 11th year, the award-winning festival features a lineup of 20 acclaimed films with filmmakers and other speakers presented over seven days. Films and additional programs are scheduled both during the day and in the evening at the library, on the Princeton University campus and at the Princeton Garden Theatre. more

By Taylor Smith

Thanks to Audible’s Donald Katz, the general population now has more time than ever to consume and enjoy books by creating a digital library on their mobile devices. A membership allows users access to more than 325,000 downloadable audiobooks, audio editions of periodicals and other programs. New members are also given complimentary subscriptions to the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, making the inevitable commute or time spent at the gym, not only easier, but that much more enlightening. Below, Mr. Katz discusses his pre-Audible career as a journalist, love for Newark, and the company’s growing a-list collection of inspiring celebrity performances. more

By Anne Levin

Photographs Courtesy of Princeton in Africa 

fter the deadliest flooding ever recorded in Malawi, a group of recent college graduates were on hand to help with emergency response efforts. In rural Togo, another corner of Africa, some of their colleagues wrote grants to help an organization called Mothers2Mothers in their fight against pediatric AIDS. Still others from the group taught English, math, science, and history to secondary school students in Botswana. more

Navigating the sometimes troubled, always exciting waters of family, finance, and politics. 

By Donald Gilpin 

Portrait by Andrew Wilkinson

To say that Tom and Barbara Byrne thrive on difficult challenges would be an understatement. With all four children launched—this is the first year since 2006 they haven’t had a son or daughter at Princeton University—the 62-year-old Hun Road couple, whose groundbreaking resumes place them at the top of their professions, might be expected to be looking forward to retirement.

But no. They have other plans. more

By Anne Levin

If you attended a charity auction to benefit McCarter Theatre, Trinity Counseling Service, Princeton Charter School, or any number of other organizations in town last spring, you probably encountered Sebastian Clarke. He’s the lanky, personable guy who runs the show, rattling off the numbers and “filler words” to coax bidders higher and higher—but always with a light touch. more

The Immigration Act of 1917 | One Hundred Years Later 

By Katie Duggan

Immigration is a foundation of the American experience, and an integral part of American life today. It has been frequent topic of discussion for politicians and social activists alike, especially in last year’s presidential election, leading to many divisive conversations on what the future holds for immigrants. But questions of who should be allowed entry into the United States are not unique to today’s political climate nor to the nation’s past. February 2017 marks the one hundredth anniversary of the passage of the Immigration Act of 1917, which was at the time the country’s most sweeping piece of immigration legislation. It was passed under President Woodrow Wilson, and required that immigrants entering the country first pass a literacy test. more

By Anne Levin

A cluster of young women in semi-formal dresses is standing in the back of a candlelit auditorium at Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart. Teetering a bit on their high heels, they whisper quietly while awaiting their turn to take part in an annual tradition known as the Junior Ring Ceremony. more

Princeton President Christopher L. Eisgruber and 47 other American college and university presidents today sent a letter to President Trump urging him to “rectify or rescind the recent executive order closing our country‘s borders to immigrants and others from seven majority-Muslim countries and to refugees from throughout the world.” “If left in place,” the letter says, “the order threatens both American higher education and the defining principles of our country.

The letter was initially drafted by Eisgruber and University of Pennsylvania President Amy Gutmann.

The text of the letter follows:

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