OLD MILL, NEW LOOK: A view of the interior of Isles’ Mill One facility, a historic mill in the final stages of renovation, that will serve as the home of the organization’s Social Profit Center. (Photo courtesy of Isles, Inc.)

By Doug Wallack

On Saturday, October 21, Trenton-based nonprofit Isles will hold its first ever Fall Fest fundraiser in the new Social Profit Center at Mill One in Hamilton. The event will feature food and drink from local restaurants and vendors, along with performances and works from area musicians and artists. The Fall Fest is meant to showcase the greater Trenton community and to celebrate the renovation of Mill One — the historic mill building on the Hamilton-Trenton border that Isles purchased in 2006.  more

Photo Credit: Trek Bikes

Plan your next biking adventure!

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PCDI teacher Melissa Edwards and Ginny.

A spectrum of challenges and hopeful possibilities

By Donald Gilpin

Autism now affects one in 68 children and one in 42 boys in the United States. New Jersey, with one in 48 children and one in 28 boys, has the highest rate of autism in the country. More children will be diagnosed with autism this year than with AIDS, diabetes, and cancer combined, and the cost of supporting an individual with autism during his or her lifespan can be upwards of $2.4 million.

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By Wendy Plump

No one is asking children to give up their sports. But it’s getting a little crazy out there.

In one generation, sports have gone from child’s play to a proving ground for elite athletes—many of whom haven’t even graduated eighth grade—who commit to strenuous schedules, trainers, travel teams, coaches, aggressive tactics, and year-round seasons that give a young body no quarter for rest and growth. Coaches book flights to cities far beyond their hometowns. Parents shell out thousands of dollars for participation fees. And college recruiters wait eagerly in the background until it’s time to dangle offers that are impossible to resist. more

Prof. Janet Currie, Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University and Director of the Center for Health and Well-Being. 

By Donald Gilpin

Every day more than 140 people in the United States die from an opioid-related overdose, and deaths from opioids continue to increase, almost quadrupling since 1999.

Responding to the report of a special commission chaired by New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, President Trump recently declared the opioid epidemic a state of emergency. more

Bryan Rebimbas and therapy horse Penny at the Annual Riding with HEART Fun Horse Show.

Therapeutic Riding Program Seeks Items for September 23-24 Fall Tack Sale 

Riding with HEART, Hunterdon Equine Assisted Recreation and Therapy, is seeking donations of new and gently used horse tack, equestrian clothing, and barn equipment for its Fall Tack Sale, scheduled for September 23 and 24 at its Pittstown (Alexandria Township), New Jersey farm. more

HIGH INTENSITY: Trish Reilly looks for the ball in action last fall during her freshman season for the Lehigh University field hockey team. Former Princeton High standout Reilly saw time at midfield and defense during the 2016 campaign, receiving the program’s Coaches Award. Reilly, who has been voted as a team captain, is looking to earn a starting role on defense this fall for the Mountain Hawks. Lehigh begins its 2017 campaign when it hosts LIU-Brooklyn on August 25. (Photo Courtesy of Lehigh Athletics)

By Bill Alden 

For Trish Reilly, playing college sports was a matter of following family tradition.

Her father, George, played football and competed at track at Brown University, while her mother, Ann, was a field hockey player for the Bears. Reilly’s oldest sister, Meg, played for the Muhlenberg College lacrosse program while older sister Katie was a lacrosse player at Amherst College. more

Photography by Erica M. Cardenas

The Annual James E. Cryan Memorial Tournament took place July 29 through August 5, 2017 at the Mercer County Tennis Center, located at 1638 Old Trenton Road in West Windsor. Established in 1965, the Tournament honors Mr. Cryan for his contributions to the sport of tennis in Trenton, NJ prior to his death from Hodgkins Disease in 1964 at age 42. more

Photo Credit: @garmin

Kids don’t have to have all the fun! Adults can enjoy the spirit of the fall season with tech gadgets, bikes, locks, and computer equipment to make that transition back to work, all the easier.

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TEAM WORK: “The issue in aging is that everyone is an individual, and the issues are different for every family. The family dynamics are different, and the fragmented healthcare system is very challenging. We are the single point of contact, the quarterback who can help people find what they need.” Joanna Gordon Martin, founder and CEO of Theia Senior Solutions (back row, far right), is shown with the company’s team of experts.

By Jean Stratton

If indeed, as studies indicate, 10,000 baby boomers are turning 65 every day and will continue to do so for at least the next decade, the implications for the health care system, for seniors and spouses with health problems, and for adult children of aging parents are very challenging. more

TRIUMPHANT AT THE FINISH: A team celebrates completing the R2C relay just beyond the finish line in Manasquan. (Photo by Paul Mecca: PaulMecca.com)

By Doug Wallack

Early on Saturday morning, 44 teams comprising over 300 runners will gather in Lambertville, on the banks on the Delaware River, and head east across the Garden State, winding 72 miles through Mercer and Monmouth counties before arriving at the beach in Manasquan late in the day. This year will mark the 22nd running of the River 2 Sea Relay, an event that for many participants has become a beloved annual tradition. Each team of seven divides the course’s nine stages between its members in an event that embodies teamwork to an extent that is rare in the world of distance running.  more

2017 Youth Athletes (Photo Credit: Special Olympics New Jersey)

By Doug Wallack 

Special Olympics New Jersey (SONJ) held its annual summer games last month. June 9th, the night of the opening ceremonies, showed the Garden State summer at its finest; as the sun went down, temperatures hovered at a dry 70 degrees. Nearly 2,500 athletes of all ages had come to that weekend’s games, held on the campus of The College of New Jersey, to participate in seven sports: aquatics, track and field, bocce, powerlifting, softball, tennis, and gymnastics. For some, the New Jersey games would serve as a qualifying event for the Special Olympics USA Games — which will be held in Seattle next summer — but for all, the weekend was an opportunity to push themselves and build friendships. more

Trenton Country Club features many amenities including an 18-hole championship golf course, world-class instructors, and a pro shop. Set in the Delaware River Basin, the course is lined with large oaks and manicured greens. Trenton Country Club’s offerings have grown in recent years to include active ladies and junior programs. Competitive and social events, such as GAP Matches, Member/Guest Tournaments, 9-Hole Scotches, and Family Tournaments all add to a thriving culture and love of the game.

Below, Head Golf Professional Graham Dendler shares advice and insights on the course with Princeton Magazine. more

Liberty State Park

By Wendy Plump

On a recent train ride home from Boston, surrounded by people tapping at computers and staring into cell phones, as well as my own pile of devices, the meaning of serenity asserted itself. It wasn’t gained by answering emails or texts or squinting through news feeds, but by looking out the window at miles and miles of wild coastline and coves, a great gray ocean, and a marbled sky. Every seabird scratching in the sand or stand of evergreens leaning out of the wind served to remind me that this is what saves. more

By Doug Wallack

I turned off Route 206 and wound my way southeast toward Chatsworth, in the heart of cranberry country. Within a few miles, the farmland—acre upon acre of wheat and corn—was swallowed up by thick forest. A few miles further, the maples, oaks, and sassafras trees that form so much of the state’s deciduous canopy yielded almost entirely to pitch pines and shortleaf pines. The road became an evergreen-lined alley stretching out into the flat distance, where heat waves shimmered above the asphalt — looking for all the world as though the Atlantic had crept some twenty miles inland of its usual home along the Jersey Shore. The drive continued this way for some time, punctuated by the the occasional bog, until I arrived — almost without warning — in the middle of Chatsworth. more

Manta Ray, photographed by Jennifer Hayes

By Taylor Smith

The Shark Research Institute (SRI) was founded in Princeton, New Jersey in 1991 as a center of scientific research. The organization maintains field offices across the world in places as far reaching as Mozambique and India. SRI is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit with the mission of studying and protecting sharks and their natural habitats. SRI and its scientific research team aim to correct misconceptions about sharks and instead teach the general population to value sharks as a vital part of the global ecosystem.

Marie Levine, executive director at SRI, oversees the day-to-day running of the various networks of scientists, field researchers, members, and donors that are involved in current SRI conservation projects. more

Sweat away the day at Princeton’s latest fitness studio

By Erika Moritz

Recently, Princeton’s Palmer Square received its first Pure Barre studio at 31 Hulfish Street. Influenced by ballet techniques, Pure Barre uses small movements to tighten, strengthen, and isolate key muscles. While it is highly effective, Pure Barre is low impact, making the risk of injury extremely low. To learn more about this growing workout trend, Princeton Magazine met with Princeton studio founder and owner, Jacqui Arce-Quinton. more

Friday, June 23

10 a.m. to noon: The Friends of the Princeton Public Library Preview Sale (regular sale begins at noon and continues through Saturday, June 24 at 5:30 p.m.).

12 to 8:30 p.m.: The annual Friends of Princeton Public Library Book Sale. The sale features special collections and rare books as well as books in all genres and for all ages. Princeton Public Library.

12:30 p.m.: Meeting, Gotham Networking at Eno Terra in Kingston. The cost to attend is $38 per person. For more information, visit www.gothamnetworking.com.

7 to 10 p.m.: The Trinity Counseling Service Junior Board presents The Summer Soiree, A Taste of Hope at D&R Greenway in Princeton. Tastings of food, wine, and brews. For tickets, visit www.tcssummersoiree.orgmore

PULLING IT OFF: Princeton University women’s lightweight rower Christina Warren competes in a race this spring during her senior season. Co-captain Warren ended her college career on a high note, helping the Princeton varsity 8 to a bronze medal at the IRA (Intercollegiate Rowing Association) national championship regatta earlier this month. Last week, Warren and fellow co-captain Juliette Hackett were named to the 2017 Collegiate Rowing Coaches Association All-America team. (Photo Courtesy of Princeton’s Office of Athletic Communications)

By Bill Alden

As a young girl growing up in Sarasota, Fla., Christina Warren dreamed of being a college athlete.

Initially, Warren viewed tennis as her route to the next level, winning multiple USTA (United State Tennis Association) titles in youth competition.

But after suffering a back injury as a 15-year-old, Warren switched to rowing, joining the Sarasota Crew club program.

Warren enjoyed being part of a crew right from the start. “I think the biggest thing for me was that I was used to being on my own as an individual with tennis and when I switched to rowing it is totally the opposite,” said Warren. “It is probably the most team-oriented sport, and doing that was huge for me.” more

By Doug Wallack

The Cherry Valley Cooperative prepares for its first harvest at its new location. (Photo by Rachel Steinhauser)

“You know, the food that we’re eating is just devoid of nutrients, and it’s devoid of flavor,” Lauren Nagy says, perched on a plastic chair in the greenhouse of the Cherry Valley Cooperative. Rows of carrots, Swiss chard, kale, and all manner of other vegetable sit in starter trays stretching to the back of the facility in a patchwork of greens. A barrel-sized bucket of “compost tea” brews, gurgling nearby. Ms. Nagy explains that much of the flavor and aroma of fruits and vegetables is influenced and enriched by soil life. She says that large-scale agricultural producers tend to neglect soil quality, to the detriment of their produce. “People just don’t want to eat it — because it sucks,” she says, “We’re trying to make people like food again.” more