Princeton Theological Seminary Hosts “Conversations with Christian Leaders on the COVID-19 Crisis,” April 2

Join the Princeton Theological Seminary Office of Continuing Education on April 2 from noon to 12:50 p.m. ET for a digital panel conversation with Seminary faculty on the COVID-19 crisis. Panelists include Eric Barreto, Sonia Waters, Heath Carter, and Brian Rainey. The panel will be hosted on Zoom. 

Register, here: https://bit.ly/2Uxsbd2

About the panelists: 

Eric Barreto, MDiv ’04 is the Seminary’s Frederick and Margaret L. Weyerhaeuser Associate Professor of New Testament. As a Baptist minister, Barreto has pursued scholarship for the sake of the church, and he regularly writes for and teaches in faith communities around the country. He has also been a leader in the Hispanic Theological Initiative Consortium, a national, ecumenical, and inter-constitutional consortium comprised of some of the top seminaries, theological schools, and religion departments in the country.

Sonia Waters, PhD ’13 is the assistant professor of pastoral theology at Princeton Seminary. She is an Episcopal priest with 10 years’ experience in parish ministry and prior experience in feminist advocacy work focused on violence against women. Her research interests include addictions studies, visual culture and media, feminist and womanist pastoral theology, attachment and family systems theories, and relational perspectives on the self.

Heath Carter is Princeton Seminary’s associate professor of American Christianity. He teaches and writes about the intersection of Christianity and American public life and is currently working on a new book entitled On Earth as it is in Heaven: Social Christians and the Fight to End American Inequality (under contract with Oxford University Press), which retells the story of the American social gospel.

Brian Rainey is assistant professor of Old Testament at Princeton Theological Seminary. He earned his MDiv from Harvard Divinity School and his PhD from Brown University. Rainey is interested in ethnicity in the Hebrew Bible and ancient Near East, including anthropological, sociological, and cognitive theories of “ethnicity” and their usefulness for the study of ancient societies.

For more information, email the Princeton Theological Seminary Office of Continuing Education at coned@ptsem.edu.