Probiotic-Rich Foods for Body-Wide Health

Kimchi ramen

By Taylor Smith 

In case you haven’t heard, your gut health has a dramatic impact on your overall brain and body-wide health. The “good” bacteria found in probiotic rich foods can actually help improve the microbiome of your digestive system. The following are some of the best good bacteria-fueled foods to include in your daily or weekly routine. 

Siggi’s Icelandic Style Skyr

Not all yogurt is created equal. It’s important to look for brands that indicate “live cultures” on the package and list them. 

Sauerkraut 

Sauerkraut is pickled cabbage. The fermentation process is what cultivates and captures the healthy bacteria. 

Kombucha 

This trendy drink is actually a mixture of black and green teas (often flavored with sugar and/or fruit juices) that has been fermented. The result is akin to carbonated iced tea with a splash of fresh fruit flavor. Kombucha comes is a variety of flavor combinations and profiles, so shop around to find your favorite flavor and brand. 

Kefir 

For those who love dairy, kefir can help to meet your protein and probiotic needs. It’s best to get unsweetened whole milk brands like 100 percent grass-fed Maple Hill Organic (some brands are loaded with sugar and fake sweeteners). 

Kimchi 

A Korean staple, kimchi is traditionally fermented cabbage and radishes, however some modern interpretations can include kale. The red-orange color comes from pungent spices that have a definite kick.

Tofu 

Tofu is made from fermented soybeans and is packed with plant protein. Add cubes of tofu into your next rice bowl and veggie stir fry to round out your meal. 

Fermented Cheese 

As if you need a reason to eat more cheese! Hard cheeses like cheddar, parmesan, Swiss, and gouda actually contain a lot of healthy bacteria and are a great addition to any meal. 

Probiotic Supplement 

While not exactly a food, an over-the-counter probiotic supplement is a beneficial addition to any vitamin regime. When choosing a supplement, select one that has at least seven strains in one product. You’ll also want to look for several billion colony-forming units (CFU), which will increase the likelihood of impacting your gut in a positive way. Some probiotics do require refrigeration. Otherwise, store in a cool, sun-free environment.