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On Wednesday, October 19 at 12 p.m., Morven Museum presents an entirely virtual experience on the subject of “The Mysterious World of the Garden Grotto.” General admission is $5 and free for Morven Museum and Garden members. The Zoom webinar link will be shared via email prior to the event date. A recording will be sent to those registered following the program. Purchase tickets in advance at https://bit.ly/3e0Uaytmore

Join the Arts Council of Princeton (ACP) on Wednesday, October 26 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. for “Art of People & Stories/Gente y Cuentos.” From collecting art to tasting wine, the ART OF series aims to introduce attendees to the endless creativity and innovation in the community. Created by locals, for locals, these all-inclusive experiences require no supplies or commitment. Just bring your friends and the ACP will do the rest. more

 

Arts Ed NJ has been approved for a $500,000 multi-year grant from the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation. The grant was awarded to support its mission as a unifying organization and central resource for arts education information, policy, and advocacy in New Jersey. 

“We are so proud to have continued support from the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation,” said Arts Ed NJ Executive Director Wendy Liscow. “This grant is a testimony to years of hard work from all our partners across New Jersey who have fought to make New Jersey a leader in arts education.” more

Q&A with Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber

Interview by Wendy Greenberg | Photography Courtesy of Princeton University, Sameer A. Khan/Fotobuddy

In its 275th year, Princeton University has a lot to celebrate. As students return for the fall semester, two new residential colleges have opened — Yeh College and New College West — with the goal of increasing the number of undergraduates by about 10 percent. This past year ground was broken across Lake Carnegie for the Lake Campus Development, which will include graduate student housing, athletics, and recreational facilities. Add to the campus development an engineering and environmental studies complex, and a new art museum, anticipated to open in late 2024.

At the helm of all the activity is Christopher L. Eisgruber, a 1983 alumnus, who will continue in his role as the 20th president of the University for at least the next five years. On April 9, the board of trustees extended his presidency as the school looks toward the expansion of its undergraduate student body, increasing investments in emerging areas of science and innovation, gains in philanthropy, and the ambitious building program. Trustees cited “transformational gains” in student body diversity and philanthropic support, accomplishments that have enhanced the University’s teaching and research, and historic campus expansion as reasons to extend Eisgruber’s tenure.

Eisgruber received his A.B. in physics from Princeton in 1983, graduating magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa. He then earned an M.Litt. in politics at the University of Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar, and a J.D. cum laude at the University of Chicago Law School, where he served as editor-in-chief of the law review. After clerking for U.S. Court of Appeals Judge Patrick Higginbotham and U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, Eisgruber taught at New York University’s School of Law for 11 years.

Joining the Princeton University faculty in 2001 as the director of the Program in Law and Public Affairs, he served as the Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Public Affairs in the School of Public and International Affairs and the University Center for Human Values. He directed Princeton’s Program in Law and Public Affairs from 2001 to 2004 before being named provost in 2004. He has served as president since July 2013. more

By Taylor Smith

Julia Breen Wall

Discuss your own background and beliefs in the benefits of an all-girls education. How has this impacted your personal and professional career?

I have lived and breathed students, schools, and school leadership my whole life. As the daughter of two school principals, our family’s social life was going to school games, plays, and community events. I have always felt at home in the adaptive rhythm and joyful energy of a school; there is so much magic that is created within its walls. It is a breathing organism in every sense of the word.
I came to first understand the mission of girls’ education through the lens of my teaching experience. Teaching English to a classroom of girls in a community intentionally designed with their empowerment at the center articulated so clearly the benefits of that affinity space — where all doors remain open, where girls fill all leadership seats, and where girls are the center of the story. I was hooked! My mission as an educator was clear: to build and support schools that lift up high-achieving girls and young women who will fulfill their potential and lead our world into the future. And I have never looked back.

In what ways does faculty excellence play a role in creating a positive environment for young women to learn and grow?

The faculty of a school are its heart center. The research is clear: students who feel connected to their teachers are more likely to be engaged. Now, this requires a teacher to know each student, and to identify her own personal gifts and talents. One of the things that most excites me about leading Stuart’s faculty is that our small size allows time and space to know every girl and to support her journey. In getting to know our faculty, this aspect is one of their favorite qualities of working here.

In my mind, a true mark of faculty excellence is a deep and demonstrated commitment to professional development. We live in a rapidly changing world, and our investment in curricular and program innovation is fueled by significant investment in our faculty’s continued education. This ensures that the entire school community is continuously learning. I can’t think of a better way to model learning and leadership for our students than a teacher learning and adapting alongside their students, even (and especially!) when it feels risky, uncharted, and difficult. more

Join author Clifford Zink on Saturday, October 8 at 10 a.m. for a walking tour outside Princeton University’s storied and majestic eating clubs. Learn about the architecture, origins, and development of the 16 Classical and Gothic-style clubhouses, which date from 1895 to 1928. There will be an opportunity to visit inside one of the eating clubs; masks will be required during this portion of the tour. Copies of Zink’s 2017 book, The Princeton Eating Clubs, will be available for sale at a discounted price at the tour.  more

Standing on the plot of land once owned by Joseph Bonaparte — former King of Naples and Spain and brother of Napoleon – garden steward Lara Periard shares her enthusiasm for developing the Point Breeze Historic Garden.

“This project is unique for several reasons,” Periard says. “Unlike a standard vegetable garden or farm, its purpose is to represent the history of the land, as well as to grow food for donation to the community. We are growing historic crops, primarily what would’ve been grown by Bonaparte’s gardener at the time.” more

Join The Watershed Institute for the 47th Annual Watershed FEST on October 1 at 6:30 p.m. FEST is the largest fundraising event of the year and supports The Watershed Institute’s mission of keeping water clean, safe, and healthy. Last year’s FEST was an evening to remember,  and the organization is hoping to beat last year’s amount of $140,000 raised. All funds support The Watershed Institute’s conservation, advocacy, education, and scientific research efforts.  more

Open to the Stuart School community and the public, Toddler Time at Stuart (ToTS) is a free program that will have newborns and toddlers smiling and clamoring for more. 

Your tots will enjoy a 45-minute session centered around different themes depending on the month. So, invite your friends, neighbors, family, and anyone else who may have a newborn or toddler in need of a little interactive fun! more

On Saturday, September 24, join Monmouth Museum staff and New Jersey DEP’s lead environmental educator, Marc Rogoff, on a fossil frolic through Big Brook, one of the premier late Cretaceous fossil localities in the eastern United States. The Cretaceous period was a time when dinosaurs roamed the Earth and New Jersey was submerged beneath a shallow inland sea. more

On Sunday, September 11 at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., join Morven Museum for a special event entitled, “9/11 Day of Remembrance: The History of the American Flag.” This only in-person patriotic presentation is a way to honor and pay tribute to those who lost their lives on this date 21 years ago. Admission is free and all are welcome. more

Astrid Bayiha in “Angela Davis une histoire des Etats-Unis.” (Photo by Jeremie Levy). 

Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts, Department of French and Italian, and L’Avant-Scène will present the 11th edition of Seuls en Scène French Theater Festival, which will take place September 9 to 23 at venues across the University’s campus. Most performances will be in French, and several will include English subtitles. All are free and open to the public.  more

The Hun School of Princeton welcomes Sean Costello to the position of co-director of athletics following the retirement of Bill Quirk. Costello will collaborate with Tracey Arndt in leading the Athletic Program for Middle and Upper School students and will coach girls’ varsity basketball. Costello previously served as associate director of athletics at The Shipley School in Bryn Mawr, Pa., and as a general manager of Maplezone Sports Institute in Aston, Pa.  more

Drew University and Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) have announced a Dual-Degree partnership through the BUSPH Select Scholars program. 

The BUSPH Select Scholars program provides Drew undergraduates the opportunity to explore different options available in the field of public health and to connect with Boston University mentors for academic and career advising. 

Students accepted into the highly competitive graduate program at BUSPH may choose to pursue a Master of Public Health, a Master of Science in Population Health Research, or a Master of Science in Applied Biostatistics.  more

Image Source: https://www.instagram.com/blairwrowofficial/

While some students may have been taking a break from scholastic sports over the summer, the Blair School girls’ rowing team was hard at work. Led by varsity coach John Redos, the team sought to maintain the momentum they had achieved over the previous school year. 

Beginning in Fall 2021, Blair girls’ rowing earned first place medals at the Head of the Housatonic, one of the most competitive scholastic races in the United States. With the onset of winter in Blairstown, New Jersey, the girls moved into Blair’s new indoor rowing center on Park Street. Coaches led the girls through technical skills and cardio training as a lead up to the spring season.  more

Frank Bruni

On Friday, October 7 at 7:30 p.m. join the Mayo Performing Arts Center in Morristown for The Beauty of Dusk: An Evening with Frank Bruni. Tickets are $60 per person.

Bruni has been a prominent journalist form more than three decades, including more than 25 years at The New York Times, the last 10 of them as a nationally renowned op-ed columnist who appeared frequently as a television commentator. He was also a White House correspondent for the Times, its Rome bureau chief, and for five years, its chief restaurant critic. more

The beloved Princeton Children’s Book Festival returns on Saturday, October 8 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Princeton Public Library and Hinds Plaza. This largely outdoor, in-person event brings together some of the most popular children’s book authors and illustrators, giving families the opportunity to meet their children’s favorite storybook creators. Book sales for the event will be available from jaZams in downtown Princeton. Authors and illustrators will be available to sign personalized copies and describe some of the details and inspirations behind their books. more

On October 15 from 12 to 4 p.m., join Washington Crossing Historic Park for an Autumn Market and Encampment, a chance to travel back in time and experience life in a Revolutionary War camp.

Costumed Colonial townspeople will gather at the marketplace to show off their crafting skills and goods. Soldiers will also be on-site to drill and perform 18th century military tactics, and the fife and drum corps will stage performances throughout the day. With crafts, cooking demonstrations, and one-on-one interactions with Colonial reenactors, it’s a great opportunity to enjoy a fall day outdoors with the entire family. more

Image Credit: War “Hello” Girls, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540

On Thursday, August 3 at 6:30 p.m., join Monmouth University Professor and former U.S. Army Fort Monmouth Command Historian Melissa Ziobro for a talk on how the U.S. Army Signal Corps employed women as telephone switchboard operators during WWI. The “Hello Girls” worked long hours to ensure battlefield communications. Their chief operator, Grace Banker, hailed from New Jersey. After the war, the women fought for veteran status, and they are being considered for a Congressional Gold Medal today. more

A Safe Haven For Nearly A Century

By Anne Levin | Photos courtesy of Princeton Nursery School

In a colorful classroom lined with child-size desks, bookshelves, and cozy nooks, nap time is coming to a close. Sleepy-eyed 3- and 4-year-olds are beginning to stir on their mats. As soft music plays in the background, their teacher sets out afternoon snacks of apple slices and peanut butter.

It is a ritual that has likely been repeated, at this preschool on Leigh Avenue, for nearly a century. Housed in two simple buildings converted into one, Princeton Nursery School has been a mainstay of the Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood since 1929. It was founded by a wealthy Princeton resident, Margaret Matthews-Flinsch, to help working mothers who desperately needed a place for their preschool-aged children to go during the day. As the story goes, Flinsch was motivated to act when she discovered that her laundress was locking her child in the servants’ quarters while she worked.

Matthews-Flinsch persuaded her wealthy friends to contribute. The idea was not only to provide affordable child care, but to also give the children a preschool experience following the philosophy of Dr. Maria Montessori, encouraging development of the whole child.

From its inception, the school was integrated — unlike elsewhere in Princeton, where elementary schools remained segregated until 1948. That posed a challenge.

“The late John Matthews spoke of the difficulty his cousin Margaret experienced in obtaining funding for the school because of its integrated student body,” wrote Wendy Cotton, a former executive director of the school, in a letter to Town Topics newspaper in 2015. “Margaret’s parents, the Rev. and Mrs. Paul Matthews, and many of their friends provided financial support to the school.” more